Alexko

May 21

[video]

May 05

“Americans love to forgive a personality, or a brand, that admits fault. We despise those that cover-up their faults.” —

J.C. Penney’s First Step Toward Credibility | Inc.com

Reading this reminded me about Stumbleupon (the second sentence).

Apr 26

“When certain businesses stop making money doing their core business, they attempt to monetize whatever they’ve got left.” — Fred Amoroso: Is this the man behind Yahoo’s patent offensive? | Internet & Media - CNET News

Apr 02

How the Maker of TurboTax Fought Free, Simple Tax Filing - ProPublica

Mar 31

“When errors are added incorrectly it occurs from the fact that we do not support Linux and Linux will be able to give answers to the errors that are occuring” — Intuit Tax Pro about their web app ignoring the amount of the use tax

Mar 29

[video]

Jan 24

““Social interaction on social websites is a likely precursor for the company’s new direction” and “StumbleUpon users tend to aimlessly stumble pages with little to no interaction among users.” That’s very ironic, because before the “rebranding”, Stumbleupon had an incredibly active and dedicated community.This community curated the submissions, faithfully tagging and categorizing sites and building personal pages that reflected who they are. There were groups for a variety of interests, sharing and communication was easy, and it was a “hub” for many users. The community helped newcomers and showed them the ropes. In short, it was awesome. They stripped out the groups. They stripped out the personal pages. They made sharing harder. They made messaging difficult. There was a huge outcry amongst the core users. They got what they wanted. Mindless stumblers who clickety click.
Stumbleupon is now a wasteland..no social interaction at all, no community, no action, no life. The clickety click is not compelling enough to keep users around” — StumbleUpon Attempting To Streamline, Layoffs For 30% Of Staff | The Blog Herald

Jan 20

“You are in the right career if you enjoy it, it challenges you, and you are always learning something new…and you’d still want do it even if you were not going to be paid for it.” — 3form.org — Free Knowledge Exchange

Aug 01

“The key to being a good hacker may be to work on what you like. When I think about the great hackers I know, one thing they have in common is the extreme difficulty of making them work on anything they don’t want to. I don’t know if this is cause or effect; it may be both.” — Great Hackers

Jun 24

Lounge with Me. (by ♥Lallie♥)

Lounge with Me. (by ♥Lallie♥)